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Head Support @biddlybop / Twitter.com Head Support @biddlybop / Twitter.com Next arrow_forward

Head Support

What it is: Hand headrest that lets you nap at your desk
Invented: 2015
Average Price: $40*

This weird invention is slightly creepy-looking, but it does appear to be popular. The hand-shaped head holder attaches to your desk, and you can adjust the shape of the hand to conform to your head, allowing you to take a nap at the office, if you want. It’s sort of like a third, urethane hand.

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You can also use it to rest your chin while you stay awake and get work done. The hand-shaped head holder is supposed to improve your posture. The invention has been around since 2015, and it costs the U.S. equivalent of around $40 in total.

The applications for this time of invention are truly endless. For example, when stuck for hours on a long flight, who doesn’t crave an extra arm to help cradle one’s head for a mid-flight nap? Especially if you’re wedged in the middle seat.

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Face Trainer @DEJAPAN_Global / Twitter.com Face Trainer @DEJAPAN_Global / Twitter.com Next arrow_forward

Face Trainer

What it is: An exercise tool that you put in your mouth to tighten facial muscles 
Invented: Unknown
Average Price: $37*

This looks like a torture device from a horror movie, but it’s not. The little pink figure goes between your lips in order to strengthen your facial muscles around your jaw and mouth. This prevents skin sagging and aging. You only have to use it three minutes a day to see results over time.

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The mouth exercise training figure is made by Taruman, and it costs about $37. There are two versions: strong and normal, both of which are made of elastomer. The figure’s dimensions are 2.1” by 1.3” by 1.3” for reference. You can vary the strength based on how out of shape your face is.

While at first this might seem like a totally unnecessary invention (after all, most of us already know how to smile), medical experts have found it to be a game-changing tool for helping teach the physically disabled to better control their facial muscles. 

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