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Steely Dan – Can’t Buy A Thrill @Steely Dan / Pinterest.com | @PlanetRockRadio / Twitter.com Steely Dan – Can’t Buy A Thrill @Steely Dan / Pinterest.com | @PlanetRockRadio / Twitter.com Next arrow_forward

Steely Dan – Can’t Buy A Thrill

Year: 1972
Record label: ABC Records 
Worth Today: $1450.00*

Recorded in 1972 in Los Angeles’ The Village Recorder, Can’t Buy A Thrill was Steely Dan’s debut album. It was released in November of 1972, and it marked the beginning of a successful career for the American rock band. The classic rock album kicked off with “Do It Again” and ended with “Turn That Heartbeat Over Again.”

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The band was founded by Walter Becker and Donald Fagen, who did most of the vocals and instrumentals by themselves. Releasing music from 1971 to 1981, and again starting in the 1990s, they have seen massive commercial success.

The artwork on Can’t Buy a Thrill was done by Robert Lockhart and features a scene from Rouen, France (it was banned in Spain). The album’s cover art was later called the seventies “most hideous album cover” by Steely Dan’s own members.

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The Beatles @AgaAgnes666 | Yesterday & Today @FabFourFanAttic / Twitter.com The Beatles @AgaAgnes666 | Yesterday & Today @FabFourFanAttic / Twitter.com Next arrow_forward

The Beatles – Yesterday & Today

Year: 1966
Record label:
Capitol Records
Worth Today:
$125,000*

Sometimes, it’s not just the record itself that draws attention, but the artwork. 1966’s Yesterday & Today by The Beatles proved to be famous for more than just John and Paul’s lyrical talents. The compilation album originally had the band on the cover covered in meat. The record label wasn’t too thrilled so decided to swap it out for something more palatable. 

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Yesterday and Today was the Beatles’ ninth album on Capitol Records, and it actually contained songs that Capitol refused to release from the band’s EMI albums. It also had songs that the Beatles released elsewhere in non-album form. The idea was to drive up fan purchasing, and Capitol ended up being very successful in that.

There are a select few versions of the album with the original cover still circulating. In February 2013, one such copy sold for $125,000. That’s a lot of money to spend on one circular piece of plastic, but it’s gold dust to collectors. 

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