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Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey @bullseye2100 / Twitter.com Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey @bullseye2100 / Twitter.com Next arrow_forward

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey

Entered Service:1989
Manufacturer: Bell Textron & Boeing
Cost:
$118 million*

Two of the world’s leading defense firms created the Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey. After a late-eighties military crisis underscored the need for a new vertical-takeoff, long-range, high-speed aircraft, the DOD tapped Textron Inc and Boeing Co. to build the multi-mission aircraft as quickly as possible. The V-22 Osprey flew its first mission in 1989.

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The Osprey is designed with the functionality of a regular helicopter. However, it has the high-speed, long-range cruise performance that you normally find on a turboprop aircraft, giving the Osprey both practicality and lethality. The Marine Corps, Air Force, Navy and Japan Ground Self-Defense Force all use the V-22 Osprey.

Development of the Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey was protracted and rather controversial. It was so costly to begin with, and the cost continued to increase. In 2001, an LTC was relieved of duty after he falsified records to make the Osprey appear more reliable. Despite these hiccups, the Osprey was put into full-rate production in 2005.

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Christening of the USS Gerald Ford @verge / Twitter.com Christening of the USS Gerald Ford @verge / Twitter.com Next arrow_forward

USS Gerald R. Ford

Entered Service: 2022 (TBD)
Manufacturer:
Newport News Shipbuilding
Cost:
$13 billion*

Construction of this large warship began on August 11, 2005. Northrop Grumman held a ceremony where they cut steel for a fifteen-ton plate (part of the side shell of the carrier). The keel was laid down a few years later in November of 2009. In November of 2013, she was christened.

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At one point, the USS Gerald R. Ford was the largest aircraft carrier in the world – and one of the most expensive crafts of any kind in the US military. This incredible feat of engineering was conceived more than 15 years ago, with construction requiring many years and thousands of workers.

After a few delays, the USS Gerald R. Ford was finally commissioned and delivered to the Navy in 2017. Most of this vessel’s features have all been tested and approved, though it is not yet scheduled to disembark until sometime in 2022.

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